Work For Hire Chores

chore board free printableMy older boys are 7 and 5, and like their mother before them, they have chores.

We have everyday chores (setting and clearing the table, helping to load the dishwasher) and we have Saturday chores (refilling the toilet paper in the bathrooms). These aren’t chores they get paid for… these are chores they do because they’re part of our family and we all help out. Recently though, they’ve latched onto the idea of earning and saving money and so I wanted to come up with a special way to encourage that. After all, mommy has owned her own company for 10 years and I love the idea of young entrepreneurship! ~Rachel 

chore board for kids

I created my version of a Work For Hire Chore Board. I attached different tasks and the $1 the boys can earn if they complete them. 

paying for choresThe boys get to choose which of the tasks they want to complete in order to earn their money. Each week I can reuse the old tasks or create new ones!

kids chores for money

I’ve included the FREE Printables so you can create your board too! Simply snag a bulletin board, small binder clips and dollar bills (if your kids are older, consider bigger responsibility/more money). I left the chore tickets blank so you can just print them out and fill them in yourself.

work for hire banner

 

chore tickets

 

rachel hollis kids chores

 What do you think, is this something you’d try out with your own kids? I’d love to hear your thoughts below! ~Rachel

200 Responses to “Work For Hire Chores”

    • Rachel Hollis

      Jacqueline, my boys were literally BEGGING me to let them do these. They thought it was so cool (and I’m sure those dangling dollars helped too!) ~Rachel

      Reply
    • Cathy

      I like it! I’m going to try it with my 14 yo.. I’ve been paying her at the end of the week if she does extras and sometimes she does , sometimes she doesn’t. Maybe seeing the money will motivate her.

      Reply
      • Amy R

        I have a 12 and 14 year old. I have a similar plan in place, but pay them after 10 chores completed. I know they will be motivated by immediate payment. Love it!

        Reply
        • Sandy

          I like both ideas. This one and yours. I like this one because it does help motivate and get them moving. But I like your way of doing it too, because it teaches patience and not needing immediate gratification.

          Reply
        • MrieElaina

          That’s an even better idea!!! I think I am going to try that with my 11 and 13 year olds. Thanks!! 🙂

          Reply
        • Christine

          That’s a great idea! prepares them for real life, you don’t get paid every day, some companies pay their employees once a month, hmmm that’s an idea, teaching patience AND budgeting all at once 🙂

          Reply
      • Angelina Schilt

        Rachel, I really love this idea and wish I had seen it a few years ago and in time for the teenagers I was raising. My own littles are now 5 and 3 and this will certainly be on my to-do list for a year or two from now. As for Cathy trying it with her 14 y/o, I hope it works. A different version I heard of recently that you may want to try since she is older is to have an agreed list a 5-10 daily chores for her to do each week. The idea is to set the $5-10 in ones (or whatever amount you agree on) out in plain view for her and you both to see/have access to. If she completes everything for the week, you hand her all the ones. However, if the end of the day has come and she has not held up her end of the agreement, you remove a dollar from the cup, envelope, or whatnot when she is present. At the end of the week, you hand her whatever has been earned. At 14, in my opinion, she is old enough to not look at chores as a punishment or something she is forced to do; but rather 1. a contribution to the overall benefit of the family as a whole and 2. as a way to put in extra effort and earn herself extra spending money. For example, she will get to order a school/band/sport sweatshirt or t-shirt just because she’s your daughter and it comes with being involved in school..and, in our house we’d pat for that. Snacks at the Friday night football game are extra and she has the option of earning extra money for that. Hope that helps and makes sense.

        Reply
        • Jonna Hackman

          I think this is a great idea for the older kids. Mine our 13 and 15. They need to have some form of accountability for everyday besides me reminding them.

          Reply
        • Debbie B

          I started my little ones at an early age with little incentives. Little things like putting away they toys and helping me with little jobs. They were given little treats (fruit snacks, etc), small toys and to this day they are teens now and they enjoy helping me around the house. I did not have a bulletin board (I wished I had 🙂 ) but it is nice to teach them that you are never to old to learn or never to young to make a difference (my motto).

          Reply
    • Teresa

      I LOVE THIS IDEAL . I ‘M DOING TO START DOING IT WITH MY KIDS WHO ARE TWO 10 YRS OLDS AND A 12 YRS OLD.

      Reply
  1. Kristie Andrews

    How can I download these? I have been doing something kind a like this for a while and love your touch.
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Hi Kristie,
      If you right click on the image it should open a list click “open link in a new tab”. It will open to just he photo then you can right click and save it on your computer or just drag it to your desktop. I hope you have fun with these! ~Rachel

      Reply
      • Shannon

        I LOVE this!!! I’ve saved both items to my desktop but I’m not computer savvy enough to figure out how to be able to print my own jobs/descriptions onto the work for hire ‘tickets’.

        Reply
        • Shannon Kollat

          Hey shannon, if you right click on the image that you want to print it will give you a choice to move the image to another page, left click on that choice, a new page will open and the image should be there. Then right click on the image again and it should give you an option to print. Good Luck.

          Reply
  2. [email protected]

    What an awesome idea. Visually rewarding . Love it!

    Reply
  3. HEATHER TOTH

    GREAT IDEA! I’m going to be clipping on some Fives to entice my 17yr old to do some big stuff, like cleaning out my van… 😀 Thanks! (PS Where did you get those awesome umbrella push pins?? I love them!)

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Heather,
      Love the idea of getting teens involved too! The push pins were a hostess gift for a party we threw years ago (isn’t that a cute hostess gift??) so I’m not sure where they came from but I keep thinking I’m going to figure out how to make them and then put them on the site! ~Rachel

      Reply
  4. Renee Waugaman

    I love this idea! Thinking I may employ this idea with my teen. She is always needing money, and with her heavy workload (school) she is unable to fit in the time for a job, which I don’t really mind, as she has taken all “honors” courses. This would be an excellent way for her to “earn” some money for the things that she wants.

    Reply
  5. Chris

    My two kids (11yo son & 6yo daughter) have grasped the idea of earning and saving money for certain toys or games and this is to cool! Awesome idea! Thanks.

    Reply
  6. Diana

    What a FANTISTIC idea! The family members can see the cash they will be getting, so it’s definitely more tempting. Woot! My husband might even be tempted by the cash, hehe! What a terrific idea! Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      I like that you (the mom) can come up with all the ideas when you have the time… because whenever they ask “what can we do?” I have trouble coming up with good tasks on the fly. This way you’ve done it well in advance. ~Rachel

      Reply
  7. Julia X.

    I love how easy this is! I have a 6yo son, and he is constantly asking for stuff. This would give him some enticement to help out a bit more!

    Reply
  8. EMily

    What a great idea!! This would be incredibly motivating to my two boys, 7 and 10. They usually do their everyday cleaning/homework/dishes jobs in order to earn video game time, but this would be great for bigger jobs like laundry, cleaning the playroom, etc.

    Reply
  9. kt

    Hmm. I think I can modify this to where some jobs have a different wages or wages are paid based on the length of time to complete the chore, reason being some chores take more time to complete than others and time is money. Just like in a job, you can receive hourly wages it could help kids learn the value of their time. I had to use a clock method with my father, because I had to show him that some chores such as cleaning the kitchen, (stove top, counters and putting away dishes) to his standards did not take 10 minutes total, rather it took 30.

    Reply
  10. Diana

    TOTALLY WORKED!!! Mookey just got home from school. I showed him the tasks and the dollar signs and his eyes lit right up. He then immediately took care of two things that I can not physically do, (1- remove the air exchange vent, scrub it, vacuum the vent behind it, and replace, 2- take the dog room gate into the shower and scrub it clean, then replace it)!!! We have a spot for him to put the finished task tags that will then be exchanged for money. I took the tags, checked his work, and put five dollars into the basket. Since he’s older, I don’t have to have the actual dollar bills hanging there, although, when the newness wears off, I will probably do that, just to spark his interest again. (Each task is assigned a dollar amount, which I write in the top tab of each task sheet. The amount of time estimated for each task is written on the side.) Thanks TheChicSite.com for the marvelous idea!

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Diana, thank you so much for your email and the picture!! It absolutely made our day in the office and some of us (me) might have even gotten a little misty eyed. We work so hard on our posts here and we truly want to be helpful to other women. I’m so happy to hear that you got some value out of our work. Lots of love from #ChicHQ xo, Rachel

      Reply
  11. Tricia Dunstan

    I love this! I do the dodots family systems and I’m going to add this to it for those extra jobs they are always asking to do for tickets. Thank you!!

    Reply
  12. Pamela

    This is a FANTASTIC IDEA! We are at the same minds as there is everyday chores without pay but we are trying in still in our almost 5 year old that he can also earn money for the piggy bank. This is a great way to earn it and have a visual as well. I may add an image so he will have a better idea since he doesn’t read but he does understand what money is. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  13. Angel

    You may just be a lifesaver for my son. He is 13 and I can not get him to do anything. We have tried bribing him with money before. But I just don’t think he gets it. He has ADHD and can not focus long enough to finish a list of things. So I am hoping with listing what all he needs to do with the visualization of the money maybe he will get the concept. Thank you so much!

    Reply
    • Cora R.

      I liked Angels comment. I am raising my granddaughter and she has ADHD also. I think she would do the chores with the list and the money attached. She is 6 and has to pull everything in her room out all at once. Thanks Chicsite for the idea.

      Reply
  14. Jenny Lynn

    I have all older kids. In fact this year I will have 3 teens left at home. My adult children are starting marry or leave the nest. When I went back to school to become a nurse, the chores and the chart went out the window. I have been looking for a way to refresh everyone motivation to help. I love this idea and am going to modify it a tad to make more age appropriate. Great job inspiring.

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Hi Jenny,
      We’ve already heard some great feedback of readers who’ve tried this with teenagers. I think flashing the cash is the perfect motivator for the older kids. Hope it turns out well for you! ~Rachel

      Reply
  15. sue

    Wow! We’ve had this exact same system in our house for years, (minus the cute board and visible cash) so of course I think it’s brilliant. We just have a list on a white board. But I think flashing the cash is extra incentive. My kids are teens and I’m still going to change over to this cute way of doing it.
    PS We have the added rule that they have to take the initiative and if they don’t and I get tired of waiting for the chore to be done, they have to do it for free. It usually takes me weeks to get tired of waiting so they have plenty time to decide to do it for pay. =)

    Reply
  16. Cari

    This is perfect! My 8yr old wants to buy a certain lego set and so we are going to work up a budget sheet for her to keep track of her allowance. but I think a few extra chores that she can earn money towards her purchase is a great incentive and teaching tool. If she works hard she gets her reward sooner. When she saves money she can purchase items that she really wants. Hoping this will help her learn value, goal setting, and responsibility.

    Reply
  17. Karen Ballard

    I think this is an awesome idea. Teaching children ways to earn money instead of just expecting mom or dad to give it to them.

    Reply
  18. corinne

    I have been wanting a chart but couldn’t find a good one. I am so going to do this! They will love it and I could really use the help from them!

    Reply
  19. Roma Mollins

    like the idea, but in Canaada our $1, $2 are now coins. would need to adjust to add coin holders …. maybe adding a small snack bag to hold the coin…… because $5 a job – our smallest paper money-won’t be happening!!

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Gosh Roma, thanks so much for this insight… I didn’t even think about other countries and how you’d handle coins instead of bills. I think a snack bag with the coins is a great option as the push pins would hold it to the board. Good idea! ~Rachel

      Reply
      • sherny

        I think it’d be cute if you could add make the original “job slip” a little longer (perhaps the length of a bill) and then use cute washi tape to attach the coin.

        Reply
    • susan h.

      Scrapbooking stores have clear acid free pockets that are made to hold photos. They come in different sizes and formats. Some even have adhesive on the, This might be something that you could use for coins.

      Reply
  20. Andi Lau

    I did this some 21 years ago with my two daughters. They had a job weekly job chart that they could earn money for if they wanted. Jobs had different amounts they could earn. Some jobs were daily and some jobs were weekly.

    Reply
    • Andi Lau

      My girls didn’t get an allowance, so on their job charts I would put, make your beds, practice your instrument for 15 min. get up without being grumpy (my one daughter) and put an amount. Back then it was like 10-25 cents daily. Weekly jobs like emptying litter box, vacumming, etc got more money. They would then have to total the daily and weekly amounts (math skills) and turn in their job charts. If they did everything, it could amount to $5-10. Half went into the bank and they could spend the rest if they wanted. I would change tasks as needed.

      Reply
  21. chelyn holub

    LOVE this idea but I am wondering if you have a list of chores you created as I have a difficult time thinking outside the box of the everyday chores! Thank you!

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Hi Chelyn,
      I didn’t make a list but I’ll tell you what I did for my kiddos and maybe that will give you some ideas. My boys are 7 and 5.
      – Sweep off the front porch (move the door mat and put it back when you’re done)
      – Vacuum the playroom (must clean up all your toys BEFORE you start)
      – Organize the Tupperware drawer – remove everything, wipe it out, put back in stacks
      – Dust and Polish the tables (we have 3 wood tables in our house)
      – Use a damp towel to clean the dust off the baseboards… they get a $1 per room

      I hope that helps!! xo, Rachel

      Reply
  22. Liane

    Brilliant! I bow down to you and this awesome idea! I’m going to do this with my 14yo daughter (and, what the hell, possibly with my 18yo son if he can’t find a job this summer when he’s home from university).

    Reply
  23. Megan

    I love this because my daughter (10) is always asking to earn money but doesn’t like the suggestion I have. This way I can say go check the board and if you don’t like your options your out of luck. 😀

    Reply
  24. Kayleen

    This is a great idea. If your kids are old enough (or young and savvy enough) to know about Bitcoin, that would be pretty cool, too. And they couldn’t “cheat” and just take the dollar bill. 🙂

    Reply
  25. Hailey

    Great idea. I’ll have to share this with my husband, but great idea to get the kids doing something without me getting upset with them. Thank you for your wonderful idea!

    Reply
  26. Tracy

    Thank you for this, I have an 18 year old and 15 year old boy and I was just talking to my husband about doing something exactly like this. Of course $1.00 are not going to be working for them but I am going to make the dollar amount high enough to get major stuff done, but not so much that I will go broke. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
  27. angel

    I love the idea. I have lazy teenagers who do nothing and always ask for money. I will keep the dollar the same but probably do more smaller jobs for them to get it all done and get the kind of money they always ask for. So instead of picking up the living room and vacuming it may be 2 jobs a dollar each. Awsome idea.

    Reply
  28. Michelle

    I too love that the $ is right there, waiting for the kids to take them. Makes it much more real than me saying hey if you do this I’ll give you x. Great idea!

    Reply
  29. Cheri

    Love this idea! I’ve been looking for something to get my kids motivated on their own. I hate that I beg & plead for them to just do simple chores. If I don’t actually ASK or REMIND them daily – it doesn’t seem to get done!! This seems like a possible solution. PS – What font did you use on these cute tags? I want to print them on my computer and knowing the font before hand will keep me from trying them all 🙂

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Hi Cheri,

      It was a free font I downloaded online called “KG Skinny Latte” I don’t remember where I downloaded it from because it was a while ago but maybe if you google the name you can find it. ~Rachel

      Reply
  30. Julia

    I love this idea, I have to admit, I did not grow up knowing the “extra chores” that need to done around the house, other than taking a room completely apart, cleaning everything, and putting itback together. It would be nice to see a list of some of the “extra” chores that some people do.

    Reply
  31. Debbie L

    i am thinking of doing this for my grandsons for when they come to visit and i usually pay them to help out.
    also be good for when they travel with us in the RV.

    Reply
  32. Kelley

    I love this idea so much that I made one today. I had a picture frame that was missing the glass and had left over pieces from our floating floor installation. That I put the pieces together, cut it out the size of the frame, used pins and some hooks. It turned out great. Thanks for the idea.

    Reply
  33. Jenni

    Trying to visualize a Canadian version since the smallest bill we have is a $5. Any ideas for a one dollar coin that would look as inviting and cool as your dollar board. If not I may just pay them in Amercican currency. That’s a great way to save—haha. Okay not so motivating when they want to spend it

    Thanks

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Hi Jenni,

      Another mom brought this up too (sorry, I didn’t really think about other countries currency when I made it!) I suggest pinning a little sandwich bag to the board holding the coins. I think that would work out well. ~Rachel

      Reply
  34. Carmen

    I love this! This may help my boys become more motivated to help.
    Just curious, I noticed on the picture you posted (for everyone to use) that you put “boss.” And on the one you made for you, had “mommy and daddy.” Would it be possible to have one that says “mommy and daddy” (or mom and dad) too? I just like that wording a little better. If not, that’s okay…just wanted to ask. 🙂 Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  35. Heather

    Ive been doing random “hey thanks for helping” rewards when its been a long day and one child (I have 4) has been very helpful. I think I might do something like this just so its more organized. My oldest especially wants to open a savings account so she would love this.

    Reply
  36. Andrea

    This is awesome… okay, so anyone out there who wants to make up a nice big sample list of possible chores for those of us that can’t think of them easily enough? (I know, I’m pretty bad.)

    Reply
  37. Miranda

    I love the idea of this! For different ages I might change the ‘reward’ like for little kids it could be going out to ice cream with with mommy or daddy or picking a prize out of some little dollar store toys and stickers. For older kids I would do things like movie tickets or 15 minutes added to the curfew. This will add a little something extra without having to always give money.

    Reply
  38. Cindy

    I did this with my son all of his life, although I didn’t have such a great display board.

    Reply
  39. Katie

    LOVE the idea – just nervous my kids will grab the money when I’m not looking. They are great kids, but tricky sometimes. 🙂

    Reply
  40. andrea winbigler

    Thanks for these great printables! I am going to get this started this week with my son. He wants to save up and make more money so he can buy a WiiU.

    Reply
  41. Deana D

    Love this!! Adorable idea. My son is 4 and I really need to make weekly chores for him. I think I’ll start your board when he’s 5. 🙂

    Reply
  42. Kelli

    Love this idea!!! I also have 5 and seven year old boys!! They love money and I think they will work extra hard for the money. Great visual

    Reply
  43. becky prewitt

    So super excited!!! My three girls, 16, 14 and 11 each have a weekly chore room and they do their own laundry, but I have trouble paying them for these responsibilities at their ages. What I love is that we can get a bunch of EXTRA stuff done with this system: pull weeds, clean oven, clean garage, organize bathroom closet or my lazy susan, sweep under mom’s bed 🙂 clean garage fridge, clean microwave, wipe down kitchen cabinets, wash towels/fold/put away, wash van windows, vacuum van, clean under kitchen sink, etc. and on and on. I am willing to pay good for these jobs because I don’t have time to do them and I’d love them to learn these skills (most they know) and get rewarded for going the extra mile. THANKS SO MUCH… I am designing my board today!!!!

    Reply
  44. Lori

    Just made one up and my 3.5 yr old is excited! I used a larger corkboard ($10 at walmart), put the work for hire information at the top, the regular chores list that must be completed first (save the arguing and hubby cant say he didn’t know their room had to be cleaned, toys picked up) then below did my sons name with his work for hire below that and then my daughters name with her work for hire. I used different scrapbooking paper for ea kid that I glued the chores to also.

    Reply
  45. Susan

    Wondering if this works for husbands too? Wish I would have thought of this 40 years ago when my children were little. great idea.

    Reply
  46. Cat

    Since several people have asked for “extra” chores ideas I thought I’d share my suggestions… (what your family considers “extra” may be different).
    I figure out this list by asking myself what are the chores that no one really wants to do, or rarely has the time to do. Plus any daily normal chore that belongs to another family member (especially me). Just go room by room and see what would work (including outside). Know this is a work-in-progress until you find what works for your family. I hope it can get your ideas flowing…
    The first suggestions are from Rachel that she posted above:

    – Sweep off the front porch (move the door mat and put it back when you’re done)
    – Vacuum the playroom (must clean up all your toys BEFORE you start)
    – Organize the Tupperware drawer – remove everything, wipe it out, put back in stacks
    – Dust and Polish the tables (we have 3 wood tables in our house)
    – Use a damp towel to clean the dust off the baseboards… they get a $1 per room
    – Dusting Shelves, Fireplace Mantle, End Tables, etc
    – Laundry (including Sorting, loading, switching, and folding)
    – Cleaning Windows (window sills separate?)
    – Cleaning Sliding Glass Doors
    – Washing Fingerprints, etc off Walls and Doors
    – Cleaning the Refrigerator (one shelf or section at a time?)
    – Cleaning the Oven/Microwave
    – Washing the Cupboard doors
    – Organizing the bookshelf/DVDs/CD’s etc (By style or owner or alphabet)
    – Clean under the couch including under the cushions
    – Cleaning the computer table
    – Dusting the computer monitor
    – Watering Plants
    – Scrubbing the toilet(s), inside and outside
    – Cleaning Bathroom Mirrors
    – Bathtub/Shower Walls
    – Pet areas (cleaning cat box, pet toys, food area, etc)
    – Cleaning the Car (inside and outside, separately)
    – Pulling Weeds
    – Clean outdoor table, dust furniture
    – Sweep back deck/patio
    – Cleaning the driveway/walk

    Reply
  47. Kathy

    Another idea is if your child is too young to read use pictures. If your child doesn’t read well this is a good way to encourage reading also.

    Reply
  48. Lillian Wallace

    When my 7 kids were young and still at home, we called them “money makers”. I like the concept that they need to do regular chores because they live at our home and need to contribute but also have the opportunity to earn money. Some ideas were: vacuum out the floor vents, pull weeds, pick up fallen apples off the grass, magic eraser baseboards and walls, edge the carpets with the vacuum, help sweep out the garage, wash windows (older kids), wipe out window tracks. However prices have gone up!!! Jobs were defined by quarters. 🙂

    Reply
  49. Tracey F.

    These are great…but…for some reason when I went to save and then print…they aren’t fitting right. Do you have these somewhere where they are actually printable? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Hi Tracey,

      I’m not sure why it’s not working for you as their on the site as the exact same dimensions I’ve used. Are they coming out too big or too little on your end? ~Rachel

      Reply
  50. Michelle

    I modified this a little bit. I printed labels similar to yours (I am not tech Davy enough to figure out how to convert yours) and put four on the board. My son is a college student and commutes from home. He always wants money for gas or fast food. I randomly put either $5, $10, $20 or a fast food gift certificate in each one. He couldn’t open the envelope until the chore was done so he didn’t know how much he would earn. If he completed the board by Wednesday of any given week I filled his gas tank. I no longer have to pay a seperate housekeeper since he gets many of the chores I can’t find time for finished. It’s a win-win, I am spending the same money (maybe even less) than I did with the housekeeper and still honestly giving him the same amount of money I was before the envelopes.

    Reply
  51. Lori

    I am so excited to start using this for my 20 year old daughter who has autism. We have a job chart so she can earn an allowance, but this is so motivating and immediate. I will probably modify it a bit to include getting through the day without yelling at me, following directions….Thanks!

    Reply
  52. Paula-May

    I too lobe this idea for my 6 &8 yr old girls cant wait to try it …though here in Australia $1 &$2 are coins not notes or bills as you know them so i will need to find another way to display the money for them to see perhaps pop the coins into little clear bags to hang 🙂

    Reply
  53. Chris

    I do something similar to this for my 18 year old daughter. I gave her a list of household cleaning chores w/a $ amount she could earn for each. She has some health problems and is having a hard time getting a job while still in high school so this is like her job – if I approve of her job quality she gets paid for that item & she is paid every two weeks. It helps me out as a single mom because I don’t have to work all day & come home and work around the house as much. Which means more time to spend with my daughter!!

    Reply
  54. Kelli

    I love this idea and use something similar for my littles, but also for myself and hubby. If the kids don’t get around to doing a job and we have to do it then we get the money for ourselves!

    Reply
  55. Laura Lee Anderson

    This is marvelous. We own dogs and there is maintenance to dogs. Part of the regular daily chores for my boys is to walk them at least 1/2 hour each day. They don’t get paid for that BUT…if they take them out an additional 1/2 hour…the kids AND the dogs get fresh air and exercise! The other thing for the dogs is to have the chore of brushing them every day. What about brushing the dogs teeth? Just some thoughts that we will incorporate into our home!

    Reply
  56. jessica

    I asked my 12 year old what he thought of this idea. (not going to make it if he refuses to use it) He looked me straight in the eye and said “I don’t get paid for doing ANY of that stuff. I’ll do it, but not every day.”

    Reply
  57. helen

    Love it!!! Thanks for the idea. I hate to tie an allowance to chores. Like you said, chores are part of living in the house and being part of the team. But this instant gratification should work wonders on my ten year old son.

    Reply
  58. Cristina G.

    Love, love, love this!
    Made mine today and sent you the picture so you could see how cute it came out, tomorrow i will visit my bank and get crisp new dollar bills to put under the chores but my 11 year old daughter is soooo excited to start!
    Thank you so much for sharing this!

    Reply
  59. Ashley Mack

    That’s a cool idea !! My son is going in the 1st grade next year. Maybe I’ll have him write out the
    chores one week. Next week of course he will read them . Make it something else he has to do for
    the dollar !! I do love your idea !! Thanks

    Reply
  60. Cindy

    Just found this, and LOVE it! Going to try and figure out a way to make it work. As a Canadian Mom, I understand the previous commenter’s concerns about our loonies and toonies. Just recently I was at Dollarama, and they have little ziplock bags, that would be prefect to hold a loonie or toonie. There were 80 bags in a package for $1, and the bags would be reusable for the board! Now to find the time to create this board between working 2 jobs ;). My kids are 14, 12 and 9, so jobs they can do to earn $ will get me a lot further in keeping the house cleaned up, then the nagging I do now!

    Reply
  61. Kimberly

    I was able to save the work for hire template but is there a way to add text to the boxes so I can fill in my own chores?

    Great idea and can’t wait to do this!

    Reply
    • Rachel Hollis

      Hi Kimberly,
      The only thing I can suggest is printing out the blank ones and then hand writing in your chores. Hope that helps! ~Rachel

      Reply
  62. Jody

    Hi Rachel,
    Can you tell me what font you used for your “Work for Hire” project? I’m using your free printables (thank you!) but wanted the chore cards to look exactly like yours (said in a very whiney -childish voice). No really, I love that font and can’t find it online. Thanks in advance for the inforation if you can provide it!
    Have a great day! 🙂

    Reply
  63. Brenna @ Life After Laundry

    I love your chore chart idea! Would you mind if I included it in a roundup? It would be one picture with a link back to your chore chart.

    Reply
  64. Angela

    I love this idea too, and plan to get it started this weekend. We have an 8 and a 10 year old, and they become very motivated when they can see tangible rewards. We will use this on top of the chart we already use. As for the coin issue, we use those small wedding favor tins we bought at Hobby Lobby, with a strong, round magnet hot glued onto the back. It works great with coins, they have clear lids, so the kids can see the quarters (to be used at Fuddruckers or Chuck e Cheese). We have a magnetic white board. If your chart isn’t magnetic, you could hot glue the tins to almost any surface.

    Reply
  65. Teresa

    I’m in Canada so of course the smallest bill we have here is $5 lol but we have $1 & $2 coins so I might be able to try this with small snack bags for each paid chore with the $1 or $2 coin. So many ideas have worked for a bit and then we get out of the routine so I am going to give this a try starting this week! Thank you for the great idea!

    Reply
  66. Maureen

    My son has been asking for me to come up with mommy bucks and chores related. Thanks for making this easier and crafty looking! Love it!

    Reply
  67. abedabun dawn

    I am going to do this but with a twist. Once they earn their money, they will have to put it in a mason jar that will have their name on it. At the end of the wk, they can have whatever is in the jar which will be kept near the chore board. The visual aspect is still there 🙂

    Reply
  68. Amy

    Since my kids always ask me about apps for their kindles (my kids are 8 and 10) I decided to change it a little so that they can either take the cash OR they can choose Amazon Coins which I will have preloaded onto my Amazon Account. Then they can accumulate “coins” and either buy apps for their kindles or books or really whatever they want since Amazon has it all… and best of all it will end up being cheaper than giving them actual money since Amazon coins are a little cheaper than real money. 500 coins (5.00 worth) costs 4.90 and the more you buy the more you save! I have never been able to come up with a chore chart that worked and they seem excited about this – We’ll see!

    Reply
  69. sarah

    Rachel,
    Thanks so much for this idea my son is 7 and he has learned the value of $ so now he’s always asking for some. This is a great way to get him to do the chores and get the $ right away. My one question is, you mentioned “Saturday” chores the ones they have to do because they are part of the family… Can you please tell us which chores you consider “family” chores. I would love to adopt this idea…Thank you again!

    Reply
  70. michelle henry

    We have a bulletin board with a tree that is our”money tree”. We teach that money doesn’t grow on trees. If they want to earn extra the kids have to pick a leaf off of the tree ( it has a job and cash value) and accomplish that task. Then the leaf goes into a desk sized trash can, our leaf bin.

    Reply
  71. Emily Dunham

    This is a great idea. Let them see the money and they r hooked.. lol. I will try this soon. Thank you for this.

    Reply
  72. Katherine

    I didn’t get allowance for my required chores growing up and I don’t believe in paying for cleaning up after yourself, even as younger ones. No one pays me to mow my yard or cook supper. Its part of being a family and all help out. Payment is a cleaner home and learning what clean is and why we want/need clean items/room/dishes/home ect.

    Reply
  73. sheena

    how do you print the prinatables was able to save to my pictures folder but cant print them for some reason

    Reply
  74. connie

    I have children of my own as well as work with families in crisis. Some families can’t afford to give their children much spending money but they do have something even more valuable – time. Positive reinforcement for a chore well done could be a walk to the park, time spent playing a board game or whatever the child enjoys.

    Reply
  75. Nancy

    i love it! Also instead of money the prices could be a trip to a fav park, or the movies etc. Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  76. Daryl

    I came across this a few weeks ago and discussed this with my long time girlfriend, whom I’m going to be living with once she graduates nursing school and moves to my city (we have an hour apart now). My son will be coming to live with us next summer as well (he’s 14) and the year after her brother will be coming to live with us to attend college (he’ll be 18 by that time). We have decided that each will have chores to contribute to the house, as every older child at that age should be contributing their part. My son, i’m sure, will want video games and to go out with friends and her brother will have his own things to contribute to after whatever job he chooses to work at, and this option gives each of them a little more money in their pockets at the end of the week..

    We’ve looked at this in more detail for older children and decided that options such as yard work and other odds and ends we may not be able to get to throughout the week would be a great option for each of them to earn, paying a minimum wage per hour amount, and having them log times they start and end. That being said, another option for us is babysitting her 4 year old son (at that time) so we can attend a date night for us at a more pricer cost of say, $10.00/hr. That gives us latitude to go out knowing that her son is in good hands (they are really great with her son) and will be taken care of. And, after bed, they just have to be there in case something happens… but they can do whatever while still making coin. I was long winded in my explanation but… these are just some of the possibilities of how to use this for older children when time is prohibiting for your own schedule or still have younger children to attend to but you just.. need a break!

    Reply
  77. beverly schwartz

    i can not print them out please help me i want to set this up for when my granddaughter comes over

    Reply
  78. teresa

    love this idea,i’m gonna try it with my 2 grandsons that live with me..but i can’t get it to print!! help please thank you

    Reply
  79. April

    We don’t allow any media (tv, wii, xbox, ipads, iphones, etc.) during the school week so our “extra work” earns minutes of media time whether its tv time in the evening or time on the kids ipads. This is a real motivator especially when one has earned time watching tv and the other hasn’t. They encourage one another so that they can play games together. Has worked very well for us. After seeing this I think I may also incorporate the money as well as an additional incentive.

    Reply
  80. Anna

    i actually had discussed doing something very similar with my boys. I was going to do something a tad different. Because I have one child out of my three that would forfeit a dollar to avoid cleaning the toilet, I decided to have the dollars out for the days where they could see them but instead of collecting it at the end of the day, if the chores were complete for the day the dollar moved to the next day making the earned amount for that day $2 if chores were complete. Then moved the $2 down to Wednesday making the earned amount for that day $3 and so forth. The chores for hire would start out small and build up to larger things that are really hard to get my son to do like clean the bathroom. If the chores for the day were not completed they lost some or all of the money for that day depending on what they failed to do. So basically they had to complete all the chores for the week to get the full weeks earnings. That way when it came to Friday or Saturday and there was a larger chore to do they will be more likely to complete it in order to get all the money. If they did not then it would be a bust for the week. Their would appear to be more of an incentive to complete all the chores for the entire week. If it was just a dollar and the toilet needed wiping down it would most likely stay on the board because to him, it’s not worth the dollar. BUT it would be worth getting the entire weeks earnings rather than lose them over whipping down the toilet. I would love some feedback on this method. I want them to earn the full weeks money but I also want them to understand the full job has to be completed even if I spread it out over a week so they don’t have so much to do on any particular night. By the way I have twin 11 year old boys and a 6 1/2 year old boy. When I explained what I wanted to do in order to get them to help more around the house, they were very excited. Esp. Since my twins got iPods for Christmas so they want to have money to purchase iTunes. The motivation seems to be there now. I just want to make sure I start out keeping them motivated. Thanks!!!!

    Reply
  81. Carol Rask

    I wished that I thought of this when I raised my son, he’s 34 now, haha. But if grandkids come along someday, I’ll just happen to mention it. Love the idea. : )

    Reply
  82. Brenda

    This is an awesome addition to an everyday chore list. I tried to print the Work for Hire printables, but sadly could not. there was not a link to download. Could you share as to how to print. I use a Mac. Thanks in advance! 🙂

    Reply
  83. mommiesquietplace: Amanda Ripsam

    I found your site by a email invite and I am here checking out the site. Great idea to get the kids to pitch in.

    Reply
  84. Magda

    I found this on Pinterest at the perfect time. My daughter is an Independent Daisy Scout and is working on a badge called “Make it Count ” it’s all about learning the value of money and costs of things wanted. This is the perfect project for thus badge. I will be also adding and “I earned $_____ this week, I put $____ in savings this week and I’m saving for _______ this week page on the board. Thank you so much for the inspiration!

    Reply
  85. Marci V

    I have two boys (6yrs & in a couple months 8yr old) and I want to do this for them. They are SO much into competition that I wonder if I should do 2 separate boards and switch chores every other week?!?

    Reply
  86. Laurie S

    I love this idea, my 8yr old grandson who we are raising is always complaining that he needs to get paid for his chores. I am with you on the “everyday chores” and not getting paid for these. Thank you for this idea because now I can give him a visual of the extra chores and to earn some cash!

    Reply
  87. mary

    I have started a similar plan, but its more like a work for hire meet pay as you go, they each have a jar and we use play money this works great for age 3 and up and you dont have to worry about money getting stolen. when they are ready to use cash they can cash it in. but pay as you go means they have to pay thru the day for meals, computer time,extracurricular acctivities, and they even have a donation jar that we put twords a food pantry for themselves in case they need it. this teaches them how to budget their money and giving and gives them extra incentive to do more chores because they want to keep there funds up. this is working great for my kids, I also started doing fun things with them that they can earn extra cash and gets them motivated in fitness, like pitcher challenge to get them drinking water instead of juice all day, workout with mom, which not only good for them but for me. anything that they eat to much of that is unhealthy,or drink to much of but 1 glass is good. I charge for to get them not to drink or eat as much unhealthy items. they get paid for trying new food too. this is def. an awsome idea, and the cool thing is you can turn this idea and gear it twords what things you need different in your own home.

    Reply
  88. April Wright

    This idea is fantastic! Our son is 7 and we have been trying to implement new chores and I LOVE this idea. Thanks for sharing!!

    Reply
  89. Mikaela

    thanks do much for the idea. I have an 11yr old boy who just started middle school and this is great for him to earn extra money for all those activities. I made one but don’t know how to post a pic for you. Love this website!

    Reply
  90. Val

    I saved this on my desk tap and I am able to print. As for typing in my own tasks how do I do this?

    Reply
  91. Lee Ann

    This is a great idea, that I’m going to use for “additional” money-making opportunities. A slight twist that we hit upon with our (now 12 year old) Daughter is not just “giving” money because an allowance was expected. Instead, we sit down every year (or 6 months if younger) and talk through the chores that she is responsible for (i.e. doing dishes, loading/unloading dishwasher, vacuuming, cleaning her bathroom and weekly cleaning of her room). We list them out and what an agreed definition of a “complete job” is. Then, we negotiate what the job is worth.

    As parents, we work for our paycheck. We don’t just get it because we’re there. So in helping prepare our Daughter for the real world, she gets paid for the jobs that are done WITHOUT being asked to do them. Once we have a price set, its in place until the next negotiation. If she has to be asked to do a chore, it gets done for free. If it has to be done again (because it wasn’t done properly the first time), it’s free. If Mom or Dad wind up doing the chore, WE get paid by her.

    She has the potential to earn $15 a week if she did all the chores as necessary. What she doesn’t do, is her choice and frequently winds up being free. I’d rather pay her…but it does give her a taste of working for her money. She also has to pay for TV time during Summer vacation. She can purchase in 30 minute blocks, and the time and tv are hers to watch. There are no advances given, but there are opportunities to make quick additional money, with tasks that aren’t as enjoyable (like picking up dog dirt from the yard, scrubbing tubs/sinks/toilets), but they also pay out much more.

    It’s worked out well and has eliminated a lot of arguing. I keep track on a calendar, how much money she’s earned each day and paydays are Saturdays. What she does with the money is up to her. I encourage savings, I encourage thoughtful consumerism, but in the end, the decisions are hers and if she is short, then she’ll have to wait or pick up an extra job.

    Reply
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